How to be Audrey

March 10, 2013

Audrey Hepburn, an elegant spirit

I grew up thinking of Audrey Hepburn as the UNICEF lady: a serenely beautiful, soft and well-spoken advocate for starving children. It wasn’t until sometime in high school that I watched ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s’ and realized that she’d first been a movie star whose grace and impeccable fashion sense aren’t likely to be duplicated. Not in today’s world.

While I don’t think we should ever mimic another person or attempt to follow directly in their footsteps, we can observe and admire the way they respond to various challenges or successes that come their way. Which is why I appreciated Melissa Hellstern’s How to be lovely: the Audrey Hepburn way of life: it isn’t  a step-by-step manual for emulating Audrey or a pictorial of her style, but rather a collection of simple and profound observations from Audrey Hepburn’s imperfect yet exemplary life. So, a few lessons gleaned… Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

What belongs

March 4, 2013

“What really belongs to a man except what he has already lived? What has a man to live for except what he is not yet living?” – Cesare Pavese

Get that kid some gelato, pronto.

We ate well in Italy, and not by chance. I knew that ‘x’ amount of days meant ‘x’ amount of meals and desserts and because Italian is my favorite cuisine, I didn’t want to waste a single dining opportunity. I researched food blogs and forums, magazines and even guidebook reviews and compiled a list of recommendations. During the many months leading up to our trip, I developed great expectations for memorable culinary experiences.

Too often in Rome, though, our sightseeing schedule didn’t jive with the good restaurants, which are often far removed from touristy areas. Florence, however, is a much smaller city and because we were staying in Oltrarno, an area known for delicious and reasonably priced restaurants, it turned out that every place we ate was a place to which I’d gladly return. We ate well throughout the city, though, including at the place pictured above, called Vestri, just a short walk from the Duomo.

Vestri (Borfo degli Albizi, 11r) is a chocolatier that also happens to have excellent gelato.  The dark chocolate flavor was excellent, of course, as were the hazelnut and stracciatella. Another notable gelato spot was Carapina (via Lambertesca, 18r), which is all about quality, seasonal ingredients. We popped into the small outpost near the ponte Vecchio for some sustenance after an afternoon at the Uffizi and, cups in hand, joined the small crowd of people enjoying their own cones and cups along the small, cobbled lane. Grom (via delle Oche, 24r), a chain, proved a good alternative to the puffed up bins of unnaturally colored and flavored gelato throughout the city center.  The caramello al sale (salted caramel) was particularly tasty.

A panino at ‘Ino

I’m wild about French baguettes and the freshly pressed sandwiches that are common street food in Paris. I had imagined that Italy, being home to panini, would offer a similarly good rustic bread but until we visited ‘Ino, near the Uffizi, I had been surprised and bewildered by the inferiority of Italian bread. ‘Ino has a clean, modern design (tables are barrels topped with clear glass) and offers not only plenty of sandwich options, but functions as a tiny grocery as well–a great option for souvenirs of the edible sort. The freshly made loaf (pictured above) sandwiching a few slices of proscuitto tasted as good as it looks.

How fresh and colorful can you get?!

The San Lorenzo Mercato Centrale is, to use a well-worn but highly appropriate cliche, a feast for the eyes. As it turned out, that’s just what we did: our bellies still full from lunch, we walked all over the market, gawking at the fresh produce and browsing the sweet shops. You can have a sit down meal or grab a sandwich, fruit, cheese, wine, chocolates, and other picnic provisions from one of the many stalls. Note that the streets around the church of San Lorenzo leading towards the covered food market are filled with market stalls selling souvenir t-shirts, cheap clothes, and leather goods. This is the place to bargain for that ‘Ciao, Bella!’ t-shirt you’ve been eyeing.

  • For more tips on markets, wine bars, and restaurants in Florence, check out this Florence for Foodies post from the Divina Cucina blog.
  • Carapina and Vestri are featured in this post on doing a Florence ‘gelato crawl’, by Faith Willinger.

monp (3) Cemeteries are filled with dramas and tragedies, but mostly love stories. 

monp (5)On a sunny summer’s day at the Montparnasse Cemetery in Paris, the memorials are evocative and only a little melancholy.  Two hands gently intertwine around a cross, fingers barely brushing. monp (7)Sun spills in through the treetops onto the neatly ordered, wide allées.  monp (10)A testament to the pain of crushing grief and sorrow is beautiful in its own right…

monp (9)…as is an image of soaring hope.

Love among the ruins

February 11, 2013

Stealing a kiss at the Basilica of Constantine and Maxentius (Rome).

 

coffee

On my first morning in Rome I went to a bar on via Merulana for an initiation into the Italian-style colazione of capuccino e cornetti. There was a bustle of activity as patrons coasted in and out and staff plucked pastries from display cases to the tune of the gurgle and steam of the espresso machine. The coffee cups were diminutive in size, the coffee itself rich and strong and a little bitter.  I dropped a packet of sugar into my macchiato, stirred it up a bit, and took a sip.  Delizioso.

Over the course of our Italian journey, Matt and I sampled caffè and macchiatos and cappuccinos in Rome and Florence and Milan, and even a caffè freddo in a small bar in Assisi; this slushy iced espresso drink was the perfect jolt of caffeine on a warm, sunny day. In Italy the variety of coffee was relatively limited: you could get coffee, or coffee with milk, or coffee with foam, or coffee with a touch of alcohol, or chocolate, or con panna (whipped cream). Those were the choices, and you couldn’t go wrong because they were all good choices.

I wish that was true of life in general. Read the rest of this entry »

India

I was a sophomore in college when I read Night, Eli Weisel’s searing account of Auschwitz. I finished the slim paperback in one sitting, promptly threw it across my dorm room in disgust, and began to weep angrily. I had learned about the Holocaust in high school history class, had seen the images of skeletal men with shaved heads and Nazi’s goosestepping and Hitler waving his fist and spitting out incomprehensible words, but I had never understood the deliberate, systematic nature of the persecution and murder of so many millions of people.

My earlier understanding of World War II was as an inevitability, like a tornado or earthquake, a thing that can’t be prevented and can’t be stopped–one can only lament over the destruction it leaves behind. The reality of World War II was that it had taken the participation and compliance of many people, each choosing, sometimes on a daily basis, to do terrible and destructive things.

When I finished reading Katherine Boo’s Behind the beautiful forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity, a very different, modern human tragedy, I wept as well, but it was less out of anger than sadness. I didn’t know who or what to be angry at, exactly. Read the rest of this entry »